According to Bal, space is above all place and character’s perception of this space. “There are three senses which are especially involved in the perceptual representation of space: sight, hearing, and touch” (133). Gibran’s The Prophet (1923) uses space, a city, as a focal theme of sacredness. Space becomes what Bal calls ‘an acting place’ (136). The Prophet comes down from the hill and heads towards the city named Orphalese. Though the city has no real existence, the construction of its name is very significant. The Aramaic name Orshalim, or Urshalim, the City of Peace. It is the encounter of the historic city and the mythical one, a meeting point between the myth of Orpheus and the sacredness of the geographic city. Whatever is beyond that space is the home of death and demons. The city sits in the primordial space when the latter was a garden with stars and mythical zodiacal beings…

Source: https://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/aztsb4paper.pdf
Link: Gibran’s Orphalese, the Erotic City